Hackers in Healthcare: Strong in 2017

HackersEvery year brings a fresh new set of security threats and tactics by hackers, and 2017 promises to be no different. Experts in the industry predict that healthcare organizations will continue to be a preferred target for breaches, identity theft, and cyberspying attempts.

Evolution

As cybervillains and hackers develop new strategies and shift between infiltration methods, organizations must also evolve in their security planning. Analytical data can be used to show anomalies and trends that will predict an impending incident. Constantly adding new hack profiles and defenses as well as adopting the most current protection methods reduces the likelihood of a hack’s success.

Desirable Assets

The reason that the healthcare industry is so attractive to cybercriminals is the immense amount of private data that is housed by providers and insurance companies. Consider the information that must be filled out for a simple doctor visit due to a cold. From employment information to social security and credit card numbers, addresses, and insurance policy numbers, data can be easily used for identity theft or medical fraud and spell financial disaster to victims. This data is incredibly valuable on the black market and has proven itself to be easily attainable.

Size Doesn’t Matter

Healthcare organizations large or small may be the target of hackers. Smaller, less tech-savvy providers may fall prey more easily to phishing and malware. Larger businesses could be slow to update their protection software and miss an infiltration attempt. Vendors with lackadaisical practices could cause gaps where systems connect.

Different Aim

While insurers were a common target over the past couple of years, it’s likely that hospital network breaches will increasingly be the objective for thieves in 2017. Given the myriad of old systems and rapid pace of a busy hospital, chances are good that a criminal can stumble upon one vulnerable entry point.

Other Predictions to Note

Some successful hack methods will persist, such as the use of ransomware where company assets are held hostage until a fee is paid to release the records. Effective training programs and internet filters may help reduce exposure to these programs, but the level of expertise displayed by hackers makes it extremely difficult to avoid all attempts.

Healthcare organizations will begin to feel the aftereffects of previous breaches in the form of old passwords and login credentials being used to attempt access across the industry. Government regulations will evolve to penalize hospitals for noncompliant security practices.

The coming year will be a test of defenses across the healthcare industry. Technical resources must be observant, tactical, and prepared for whatever inventive methods hackers will employ. Multi-factor authentication, thorough vendor vetting, and constant evolution of security standards are imperative in this new world of dark web crime. For more information on protecting your company network, contact ROI Networks today.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>